Mental Health quiz

It's great you are taking the time to learn more about looking after your mental health.
In this short quiz, you will be asked five questions about your life.

After each question you'll be given feedback about your response and tips for taking care of your mental health.

Question 1 - Connectedness

Is there someone in your life you can talk to if you have a problem or if you feel upset about something?

There's always someone I can talk to

It sounds like you are well connected with your loved ones - that's great!
As you would know, talking to someone you trust when you're feeling sad,
upset or confused can really help to sort things out and keep you mentally healthy.
As the saying goes, a problem shared is a problem halved, so keep it up.

There's usually someone I can talk to

It sounds like you are well connected with your loved ones - that's great!
As you would know, talking to someone you trust when you're feeling sad,
upset or confused can really help to sort things out and keep you mentally healthy.
As the saying goes, a problem shared is a problem halved, so keep it up.

Sometimes there are people I can talk to, it depends on the problem

It sounds like you're pretty well connected with family and friends,
but sometimes you just don't know who to turn to. It can sometimes be hard
to know who to talk about sensitive issues, but you may be surprised by how
willing people are to lend a listening ear and offer their support.
And, did you know that talking to someone you trust when you're feeling sad,
upset or confused can really help to sort things out?
As the saying goes, a problem shared is a problem halved,
so next time you're feeling down, you might want to try talking to a
trusted friend, family member, colleague or your doctor.
If you don't feel comfortable talking to anyone you know about a particular
issue, you can always contact Lifeline by phone on 13 11 14 or their online chat service.

Staying connected with family, friends and your community is an
important way to keep mentally healthy.
As well as asking for help during
tough times, socialising with family and friends regularly can help you to
feel like you belong, boost your confidence and prevent mental health issues,
such as depression. Think about how you feel after chatting with an old
friend, catching up with family members or simply having lunch with
colleagues. You might also consider making connections with new friends
through hobbies, sports or volunteering.
And, connecting with others doesn't have to be difficult. There are now
so many ways to stay in touch - in person, phone, text, email, social
networking, online/video chat, forums or even good old 'snail mail'!
With all these options, it's easier than ever to stay connected and look
after your mental health.

I don't have many people that I can talk to

Your answer suggests that you might find it hard to talk to people when you're
feeling sad, upset or confused. But, did you know that talking to someone
you trust during tough times can often help to sort things out?
As the saying goes, a problem shared is a problem halved,
so next time you're feeling down, you might want to try talking to a
trusted friend, family member, colleague or your doctor.
If you don't feel comfortable talking to anyone you know about a particular
issue, you can always contact Lifeline by phone on 13 11 14 or their online chat service.

Staying connected with family, friends and your community is an
important way to keep mentally healthy.
As well as asking for help during
tough times, socialising with family and friends regularly can help you to
feel like you belong, boost your confidence and prevent mental health issues,
such as depression. Think about how you feel after chatting with an old
friend, catching up with family members or simply having lunch with
colleagues. You might also consider making connections with new friends
through hobbies, sports or volunteering.
And, connecting with others doesn't have to be difficult. There are now
so many ways to stay in touch - in person, phone, text, email, social
networking, online/video chat, forums or even good old 'snail mail'!
With all these options, it's easier than ever to stay connected and look
after your mental health.

I don't have anyone I can talk to

Your answer suggests that you might find it hard to talk to people when you're feeling sad,
upset or confused. But, did you know that talking to someone you trust
during tough times can often help to sort things out?
As the saying goes, a problem shared is a problem halved,
so next time you're feeling down, you might want to try talking to a
trusted friend, family member, colleague or your doctor.
If you don't feel comfortable talking to anyone you know about a particular
issue, you can always contact Lifeline by phone on 13 11 14 or their online chat service.

Staying connected with family, friends and your community is an
important way to keep mentally healthy.
As well as asking for help during
tough times, socialising with family and friends regularly can help you to
feel like you belong, boost your confidence and prevent mental health issues,
such as depression. Think about how you feel after chatting with an old
friend, catching up with family members or simply having lunch with
colleagues. You might also consider making connections with new friends
through hobbies, sports or volunteering.
And, connecting with others doesn't have to be difficult. There are now
so many ways to stay in touch - in person, phone, text, email, social
networking, online/video chat, forums or even good old 'snail mail'!
With all these options, it's easier than ever to stay connected and look
after your mental health.

Question 2 - Physical Health

In general, how often do you feel energetic, alert and physically healthy?

Always

Your answer suggests that you generally stay in good physical health,
which is fantastic! Your physical health can have a big impact on your
mental health, so you're on the right track to stay both physically and mentally healthy.

Most of the time

Your answer suggests that you generally stay in good physical health,
which is fantastic! Your physical health can have a big impact on your
mental health, so you're on the right track to stay both physically and mentally healthy.

Sometimes

Your answer suggests that you are generally healthy, but might not always
feel 100 percent. Perhaps you've been ill or are experiencing an ongoing
health problem. Or, like many of us, you might struggle to find time to
look after your physical health regularly.
We all go through times where we don't feel our best. But, did you know
that your physical health can have a big impact on your mental health?
Your diet, physical activity and sleep patterns can all have an effect on
how your brain functions and your emotions. Eating a balanced diet,
limiting your intake of alcohol and other drugs, as well as getting about
7-8 hours of sleep every day can help you to feel energetic, alert and happy.
Regular exercise is particularly important, as it's been shown to boost your
mood and reduce depression.
Sometimes life becomes so busy, there just doesn't seem to be time to look
after yourself. Or, sometimes it's hard to get motivated. If that sounds
like you, you might want to try exercising with a friend, involving your
whole family in a new eating plan or joining a local health group or club.
Involving others often makes it easier to stick with your new routine and
stay healthy - physically and mentally. If you experience health concerns, there are lots of people who can help.
You might want to talk to your doctor or another health professional about
treatment options and how you can work together to look after both your
physical and mental health. And, having regular routine check-ups can help to
prevent more serious health problems. The Lifeline Service Finder can
help you to find services in your local area to get you started.

Rarely

It sounds like you might not be feeling your best physically at the moment.
Perhaps you've been ill or are experiencing an ongoing
health problem. Or, like many of us, you might struggle to find time to
look after your physical health regularly.
We all go through times where we don't feel our best. But, did you know
that your physical health can have a big impact on your mental health?
Your diet, physical activity and sleep patterns can all have an effect on
how your brain functions and your emotions. Eating a balanced diet,
limiting your intake of alcohol and other drugs, as well as getting about
7-8 hours of sleep every day can help you to feel energetic, alert and happy.
Regular exercise is particularly important, as it's been shown to boost your
mood and reduce depression.
Sometimes life becomes so busy, there just doesn't seem to be time to look
after yourself. Or, sometimes it's hard to get motivated. If that sounds
like you, you might want to try exercising with a friend, involving your
whole family in a new eating plan or joining a local health group or club.
Involving others often makes it easier to stick with your new routine and
stay healthy - physically and mentally. If you experience health concerns, there are lots of people who can help.
You might want to talk to your doctor or another health professional about
treatment options and how you can work together to look after both your
physical and mental health. And, having regular routine check-ups can help to
prevent more serious health problems. The Lifeline Service Finder can
help you to find services in your local area to get you started.

Never

It sounds like you might not be feeling your best physically at the moment.
Perhaps you've been ill or are experiencing an ongoing
health problem. Or, like many of us, you might struggle to find time to
look after your physical health regularly.
We all go through times where we don't feel our best. But, did you know
that your physical health can have a big impact on your mental health?
Your diet, physical activity and sleep patterns can all have an effect on
how your brain functions and your emotions. Eating a balanced diet,
limiting your intake of alcohol and other drugs, as well as getting about
7-8 hours of sleep every day can help you to feel energetic, alert and happy.
Regular exercise is particularly important, as it's been shown to boost your
mood and reduce depression.
Sometimes life becomes so busy, there just doesn't seem to be time to look
after yourself. Or, sometimes it's hard to get motivated. If that sounds
like you, you might want to try exercising with a friend, involving your
whole family in a new eating plan or joining a local health group or club.
Involving others often makes it easier to stick with your new routine and
stay healthy - physically and mentally. If you experience health concerns, there are lots of people who can help.
You might want to talk to your doctor or another health professional about
treatment options and how you can work together to look after both your
physical and mental health. And, having regular routine check-ups can help to
prevent more serious health problems. The Lifeline Service Finder can
help you to find services in your local area to get you started.

Question 3 - Sense of Purpose

How often do you participate in activities that are meaningful to you
(e.g. sports, hobbies, creative activities, social events, volunteering)?

Very frequently - more than once a week

You appear to be very active and involved in your community, which is great!
This is important, as participating in activities that are enjoyable and meaningful
to you gives you a sense of purpose in life and helps to keep you mentally active and healthy.
If you don't already do so, you might even want to consider sharing your skills through
volunteering or mentoring. Volunteering your time to help others is a great way to give
back to your community, meet new people and learn new skills. There are lots of ways to get involved
- try contacting your local council, community group or volunteering association for more information.

Frequently - about once a week

You appear to be very active and involved in your community, which is great!
This is important, as participating in activities that are enjoyable and meaningful
to you gives you a sense of purpose in life and helps to keep you mentally active and healthy.
If you don't already do so, you might even want to consider sharing your skills through
volunteering or mentoring. Volunteering your time to help others is a great way to give
back to your community, meet new people and learn new skills. There are lots of ways to get involved
- try contacting your local council, community group or volunteering association for more information.

Sometimes - about once a fortnight

It sounds like you keep fairly active and involved in activities you enjoy - well done!
However, when you're busy, it can sometimes be hard to find the time for activities
outside your work or family responsibilities. But, participating in activities that are
enjoyable and meaningful to you gives you a sense of purpose in life and helps to keep
you mentally active and healthy. It can be as simple as doing the daily crossword,
reading the latest bestseller or getting out in the garden. Even better - you could
share these hobbies with others through a book or gardening club!
You might also consider learning a new skill. You could learn a language, take music or
dance lessons, do further study or try a new sport. Or, you might want to take up a previous
hobby or interest by joining a local club, group or network. Getting together with people with
similar interests helps to build your sense of belonging and keeps you connected with your community.
Have you ever thought about helping others through volunteering or becoming a mentor? Volunteering your
time to help others is a great way to give back to your community, meet new people and learn new skills.
There are lots of ways to get involved - try contacting your local council, community group or
volunteering association for more information.

Occasionally - about once a month

Your response shows that you might not find time for activities you enjoy as much as you might like.
When you're busy, it can be hard to find the time for interests outside your work or family responsibilities.
But, participating in activities that are enjoyable and meaningful to you gives you a sense of purpose in life
and helps to keep you mentally active and healthy. It can be as simple as doing the daily crossword,
reading the latest bestseller or getting out in the garden. Even better - you could
share these hobbies with others through a book or gardening club!
You might also consider learning a new skill. You could learn a language, take music or
dance lessons, do further study or try a new sport. Or, you might want to take up a previous
hobby or interest by joining a local club, group or network. Getting together with people with
similar interests helps to build your sense of belonging and keeps you connected with your community.
Have you ever thought about helping others through volunteering or becoming a mentor? Volunteering your
time to help others is a great way to give back to your community, meet new people and learn new skills.
There are lots of ways to get involved - try contacting your local council, community group or
volunteering association for more information.

Rarely or never - less than once a month

Your response shows that you might not find time for activities you enjoy as much as you might like.
When you're busy, it can be hard to find the time for interests outside your work or family responsibilities.
But, participating in activities that are enjoyable and meaningful to you gives you a sense of purpose in life
and helps to keep you mentally active and healthy. It can be as simple as doing the daily crossword,
reading the latest bestseller or getting out in the garden. Even better - you could
share these hobbies with others through a book or gardening club!
You might also consider learning a new skill. You could learn a language, take music or
dance lessons, do further study or try a new sport. Or, you might want to take up a previous
hobby or interest by joining a local club, group or network. Getting together with people with
similar interests helps to build your sense of belonging and keeps you connected with your community.
Have you ever thought about helping others through volunteering or becoming a mentor? Volunteering your
time to help others is a great way to give back to your community, meet new people and learn new skills.
There are lots of ways to get involved - try contacting your local council, community group or
volunteering association for more information.

Question 4 - Self Care

In general, how often do you feel like you have a good balance in your life between work, family and other activities?

Always

Good for you! It sounds like you've got good work-life balance and you're feeling on top of things.
Even when things are going well, don't forget to take time out to relax and enjoy life, as research
shows that this is an important way to stay happy, productive and mentally healthy.

Most of the time

Good for you! It sounds like you've got good work-life balance and you're feeling on top of things.
Even when things are going well, don't forget to take time out to relax and enjoy life, as research
shows that this is an important way to stay happy, productive and mentally healthy.

Sometimes

Your answer suggests that you typically have good work-life balance, but sometimes things can get
a bit overwhelming. Sometimes it can be difficult to find enough time for all your commitments - work,
family, friends, hobbies, etc. Feeling torn between too many demands can be stressful and exhausting,
and this can take its toll on your mental health.
Research shows that this is an important way to stay happy, productive and mentally healthy.
We all get stressed and overwhelmed sometimes, but there are lots of things you can do to stay balanced.
Spend a minute thinking of ways you can manage your commitments and take care of yourself. Perhaps you
could make a list of activities you enjoy and try and do at least one thing from the list every day. Or,
you could start planning a holiday or short break away. If your life starts to get out of balance,
talking to your loved ones and/or your employer can help you to work together to stay on top of things.
If you ever feel like things are becoming too stressful, consider visiting a counsellor or your GP for
advice on how you can stay balanced and maintain your mental health.
Lifeline's website and Crisis Support Line (13 11 14) can also help, with tips and information for getting
through tough times and staying mentally healthy.

Rarely

Sounds like your life could be a bit out of balance at the moment. Sometimes it can be difficult to find enough
time for all your commitments - work, family, friends, hobbies, etc. Feeling torn between too many demands can be
stressful and exhausting, and this can take its toll on your mental health.
Research shows that this is an important way to stay happy, productive and mentally healthy.
We all get stressed and overwhelmed sometimes, but there are lots of things you can do to stay balanced.
Spend a minute thinking of ways you can manage your commitments and take care of yourself. Perhaps you
could make a list of activities you enjoy and try and do at least one thing from the list every day. Or,
you could start planning a holiday or short break away. If your life starts to get out of balance,
talking to your loved ones and/or your employer can help you to work together to stay on top of things.
If you ever feel like things are becoming too stressful, consider visiting a counsellor or your GP for
advice on how you can stay balanced and maintain your mental health.
Lifeline's website and Crisis Support Line (13 11 14) can also help, with tips and information for getting
through tough times and staying mentally healthy.

Never

Sounds like your life could be a bit out of balance at the moment. Sometimes it can be difficult to find enough
time for all your commitments - work, family, friends, hobbies, etc. Feeling torn between too many demands can be
stressful and exhausting, and this can take its toll on your mental health.
Research shows that this is an important way to stay happy, productive and mentally healthy.
We all get stressed and overwhelmed sometimes, but there are lots of things you can do to stay balanced.
Spend a minute thinking of ways you can manage your commitments and take care of yourself. Perhaps you
could make a list of activities you enjoy and try and do at least one thing from the list every day. Or,
you could start planning a holiday or short break away. If your life starts to get out of balance,
talking to your loved ones and/or your employer can help you to work together to stay on top of things.
If you ever feel like things are really getting on top of you, consider visiting a counsellor or your GP for
advice on how you can stay balanced and maintain your mental health.
Lifeline's website and Crisis Support Line (13 11 14) can also help, with tips and information for getting
through tough times and staying mentally healthy.

Question 5 - Positive Outlook

How much do you feel like you're in control of your life and what happens to you?

Always

It sounds like you're feeling confident and in control of your life. Congratulations! Believing in your
own abilities helps to maintain your mental health and achieve your goals, so keep it up.

Most of the time

It sounds like you're feeling confident and in control of your life. Congratulations! Believing in your
own abilities helps to maintain your mental health and achieve your goals, so keep it up.

Sometimes

You seem to feel generally in control of things, which is great. We all doubt ourselves sometimes,
particularly if things don't go how you planned or you experience some setbacks. However, believing
in your own abilities helps to maintain your mental health and achieve your goals. There are lot of
ways to build your self-confidence and stay in control.
One way to keep on top of things is to break big projects into small, manageable goals to work towards.
It can also help to write down your strengths, past achievements and what you've learned from obstacles.
That way, you can use these skills the next time things get tough. You might also have a think about simple
ways to manage stress - Lifeline's fact sheets have lots of tips about coping with
stressful life events.
Have you ever thought about how you feel when you experience success and disappointment? Research shows that
people who attribute their successes to their own personal strengths, but learn from challenges without taking
them personally, tend to be happier and have more confidence. Sometimes it can be hard to break a habit of
thinking negatively - about ourselves, others and the world. If you ever feel like this, visit a counsellor
or your GP, who can refer you to other mental health professionals, who can help you to ‘re-train' your
thinking patterns so that they are more balanced.
It can also help to surround yourself with other positive people. You could consider joining a networking group
or finding a mentor, who can provide advice, support and a different perspective on things.
If things ever start getting you down and you feel helpless, hopeless or consider harming yourself,
call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or the police/ambulance on 000. You don't have to deal with problems alone
- there are lots of people who can help you to be more confident, happy and mentally healthy.

Rarely

Your answer suggests that you could be feeling a bit overwhelmed right now. We all doubt ourselves sometimes,
particularly if things don't go how you planned or you experience some setbacks. However, believing
in your own abilities helps to maintain your mental health and achieve your goals. There are lot of
ways to build your self-confidence and stay in control.
One way to keep on top of things is to break big projects into small, manageable goals to work towards.
It can also help to write down your strengths, past achievements and what you've learned from obstacles.
That way, you can use these skills the next time things get tough. You might also have a think about simple
ways to manage stress - Lifeline's fact sheets have lots of tips about coping with
stressful life events.
Have you ever thought about how you feel when you experience success and disappointment? Research shows that
people who attribute their successes to their own personal strengths, but learn from challenges without taking
them personally, tend to be happier and have more confidence. Sometimes it can be hard to break a habit of
thinking negatively - about ourselves, others and the world. If you ever feel like this, visit a counsellor
or your GP, who can refer you to other mental health professionals, who can help you to ‘re-train' your
thinking patterns so that they are more balanced.
It can also help to surround yourself with other positive people. You could consider joining a networking group
or finding a mentor, who can provide advice, support and a different perspective on things.
If things ever start getting you down and you feel helpless, hopeless or consider harming yourself,
call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or the police/ambulance on 000. You don't have to deal with problems alone
- there are lots of people who can help you to be more confident, happy and mentally healthy.

Never

Your answer suggests that you could be feeling a bit overwhelmed right now. We all doubt ourselves sometimes,
particularly if things don't go how you planned or you experience some setbacks. However, believing
in your own abilities helps to maintain your mental health and achieve your goals. There are lot of
ways to build your self-confidence and stay in control.
One way to keep on top of things is to break big projects into small, manageable goals to work towards.
It can also help to write down your strengths, past achievements and what you've learned from obstacles.
That way, you can use these skills the next time things get tough. You might also have a think about simple
ways to manage stress - Lifeline's fact sheets have lots of tips about coping with
stressful life events.
Have you ever thought about how you feel when you experience success and disappointment? Research shows that
people who attribute their successes to their own personal strengths, but learn from challenges without taking
them personally, tend to be happier and have more confidence. Sometimes it can be hard to break a habit of
thinking negatively - about ourselves, others and the world. If you ever feel like this, visit a counsellor
or your GP, who can refer you to other mental health professionals, who can help you to ‘re-train' your
thinking patterns so that they are more balanced.
It can also help to surround yourself with other positive people. You could consider joining a networking group
or finding a mentor, who can provide advice, support and a different perspective on things.
If things ever start getting you down and you feel helpless, hopeless or consider harming yourself,
call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or the police/ambulance on 000. You don't have to deal with problems alone
- there are lots of people who can help you to be more confident, happy and mentally healthy.

This quiz is for information purposes only. It is not a clinical or diagnostic tool. If you need help now:
Visit Lifelines website and click on the "I need help NOW" button on the right
Or visit a counsellor, your GP or another health professional
Call 000 if life is in danger

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We can all take small, simple steps to stay "mentally healthy",
which can help you to get through any tough times.
You'll find lots of information on our website, Lifeline's website, & at the links below,
including facts and information about a wide range of topics.

Christian counselling, Illness, grief and loss, Life transition and adjustment issues, Personal growth and understanding, Addictive behaviours, Sexuality and sexual identity, Anxiety, stress or depression, Individuals or couples considering marriage, New parents facing change, Bringing up teenagers, Separation or divorce issues, Loneliness, Adjustment to step-family arrangements, Violence and abuse in the relationship, Workplace problems, retrenchment or retirement, Empty nest, runaway Christian counselling, Illness, grief and loss, Life transition and adjustment issues, Personal growth and understanding, Addictive behaviours, Sexuality and sexual identity, Anxiety, stress or depression, Individuals or couples considering marriage, New parents facing change, Bringing up teenagers, Separation or divorce issues, Loneliness, Adjustment to step-family arrangements, Violence and abuse in the relationship, Workplace problems, retrenchment or retirement, Empty nest, runaway